Mexican Journalist, Pablo Pineda, Slain and Dumped across the Border in Texas

The Associate Press reports : 

LOS INDIOS, Texas (April 10, 2000 9:39 a.m. EDT ) - The body of a Mexican journalist was dumped across the border in Texas on Sunday as federal agents looked on.

Border Patrol agents were watching the area Sunday and saw two men carry a large bundle across the Rio Grande, dump it on the U.S. bank and return to Mexico.

The agents assumed the bundle dumped in Los Indios, 15 miles south of Harlingen, contained something illegal and waited for someone to pick it up. They eventually went to inspect it and discovered the body of Pablo Pineda, 38, his head covered with a plastic bag, Cameron County Sheriff Omar Lucio said.

Pineda, who lived in Matamoros, Mexico, had been shot in the back of the head with a 9 mm gun, Lucio said.

"It was an execution-style shooting," Lucio said.

For the past eight months, Pineda had been a reporter and photographer for La Opinion in Matamoros. He had survived a previous shooting. His aggressive style made him unpopular with the police and criminals, said Martin Castillo, the newspaper's chief police reporter.

"He was a strong person who wanted to discover and uncover anything criminal," Castillo said. "He was snooping. He wanted to cover every story whether it be a murder, kidnapping or crashes."

Pineda was severely beaten three years ago.

"He had a lot of enemies, Castillo said.

NEWSMAKINGNEWS SOS!  WHAT DID PINEDA KNOW?  Salute!  He joins the ranks of Anson Ng, Danny Casolaro, Dorothy Kiligallen and many others.  If anyone has any information about Mr. Pineda we will post it.

Russia Unveils U.S.-Built Chemical Weapons Lab

Russia Today © 2000 reports: 

MOSCOW (Reuters) U.S. and Russian officials opened an $18.5 million U.S.-funded laboratory to help eliminate chemical weapons on Wednesday, but the spirit of cooperation was overshadowed by the arrest of an U.S. citizen for spying.

The laboratory, in a high security chemicals institute, is the first step towards building a weapons destruction complex in the Ural mountains, where a seventh of Russia's huge arsenal of nerve, blister and choking agents are kept.

While the U.S. ambassador to Russia, James Collins, hailed the opening of the unit as a mark of cooperation, Russia's FSB security service announced that it had detained a U.S. citizen and a Russian on suspicion of spying.

"I don't have a comment on it," Collins told reporters. "I was just informed that this was on the news wires."

The arrest was the latest in a series of spy cases between Russia and the West a decade after the end of the Cold War.

Post-Cold War cooperation has U.S. taxpayers providing vast sums to make safe both Russia's 40,000 metric tons of chemical arms and the United States' own 32,500 tons.

Moscow has said it cannot afford to foot the bill alone and has also asked for help in decommissioning 24 sites capable of producing anything from sarin nerve agent to mustard gas.

ONE DROP CAN KILL

"Nerve agents are very lethal - one drop can kill," said Miguel Morales, a spokesman for the U.S.-funded Cooperative Threat Reduction Program (CTRP). "And Russian nerve agents are more lethal than those of the U.S."

When Moscow ratified an international ban on chemical weapons in 1997, officials estimated destroying its stockpiles would cost $5 billion over 10 years.

The new laboratory is a high technology catacomb of whirring pipes and spotless white rooms housed in a brick building, incongruous next to the decaying concrete of the
complex. Its aim is to train scientists and build monitoring equipment.

"When you're destroying chemical weapons, you want to make sure they're completely destroyed," Morales said.

Destroying Russian chemical weapons, mounted in bombs, missiles, spray tanks and bulk containers, is complicated by welded construction making it impossible to "unscrew" them, as is the case for U.S. weapons.

Zinovi Pak, the director of Russia's Munitions Agency, welcomed the new facility, but said Moscow would not be able to destroy the 400 tons of weapons by the end of this month as laid out in the international chemical weapons ban.

"We will do everything to meet the second deadline - we need to destroy 8,000 tons by April 29, 2002," he said. Russia has started work on building one weapon disposal site at Gornoye on the Volga river and the United States has pledged to build a site at Shchuchye in the Ural mountains.

U.S. TO PAY $888 MILLION

Adolph Ernst, project manager for CTRP, said the total U.S. contribution to destroying Russia's chemical arsenal would amount to $888 million over 10 years.

But he said the U.S. Congress had given no money in fiscal year 2000 for construction - contributions are reviewed annually. "They wanted examples of Russia working in a more cooperative spirit," he said.

Pak said Moscow had allocated 590 million rubles ($20.5 million) for chemical weapons destruction this year. His U.S. counterpart, General Thomas Kuenning, said the U.S. and Russian experts had worked excellently together.

"We had a period of time when we had to learn to work with each other and learn to trust each other, but I think we're through that period now," he said.

(C)2000 Copyright Reuters Limited.


Lockerbie Trial Held To Ransom by US Lawyer Shaughnessy

09/04/00 SUNDAY HERALD © 2000, Scotland.  A powerful American lawyer is refusing to release evidence which he claims could clear the two Libyans accused of the Lockerbie bombing unless he is paid $250,000 (£160,000). James Shaughnessy, who acted for PanAm during a civil action taken by the families of the Lockerbie dead, wants the money in return for access to the series of documents, testimonies of intelligence officers and secret reports. The Scottish lawyers acting for the Libyan accused are to issue subpoenas against Shaughnessy in the US Courts to secure the evidence, fearing that unless a court order is issued he could destroy the documents.

Shaughnessy, a partner of the Manhattan law firm Windels, Marx, Davies and Ives, insists the evidence he has would not only damage the prosecution case against Abdel Ali al-Megrahi and Lamen Khalifa Fhimah, but would also exonerate them of all charges. The evidence he has allegedly points towards Palestinian terrorists putting the bomb on the plane after penetrating a covert US intelligence drug route into America.

Shaughnessy may be dragged before the Grievances Committee of the US courts and de-barred from practising law for attempting to sell the evidence. He could also be committing a major breach of the lawyers' ethical code as the evidence is the property of PanAm. Shaughnessy gathered it while building a defense for the airline during the civil court case. The evidence, currently in a secret location known only to Shaughnessy, allegedly proves the attack was planned and carried out by Palestinian terrorists, based in Germany, acting on behalf of Iran in revenge for America shooting down a civilian airbus, in which 290 people died.

PanAm was ruined by the civil case and found guilty of willful misconduct over its security for allowing the bomb on to the plane. In an attempt to defend PanAm, Shaughnessy claimed the US government knew there had been threats of an impending terrorist attack on a PanAm plane. When PanAm lost the civil case, the US government moved to impose a multi-million dollar fine against Shaughnessy for linking it unnecessarily to the disaster.

Shaughnessy submitted an affidavit to the courts as part of his defense against the sanctions. In the affidavit - which until now has been secret - Shaughnessy says he took statements from two ex-CIA officers, a German intelligence agent and a serving senior intelligence analyst with the US Drug Enforcement Agency. In it, Shaughnessy says a US military intelligence agent showed him "documentation concerning the involvement of the US intelligence community in narcotics trafficking into the United States". This was substantiated by a CIA officer. An ex-German intelligence agent told Shaughnessy the bomb was connected to Palestinian terrorists rather than Libyan assassins, and a US Drug Enforcement agency officer said drugs had been smuggled through Frankfurt airport.

The affidavit also reveals the contents of reports from US intelligence on Palestinian terrorists operating in Germany. The reports show "how and where" the bomb got onboard flight 103. Shaughnessy's affidavit also reveals details of polygraph (lie detector) tests on two former PanAm employees, which he believes show they switched the bag in Frankfurt containing the bomb.

FOR TERRIFIC COVERAGE OF THE LOCKERBIE TRIAL, CLICK TO LOCKERBIE NEWS AT:  http://www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/5260/latest.html

From Lockerbie News © 2000  More...

The trial Judge, Thomas Platt, refused to allow Shaugnessy permission to introduce this evidence. According to the report, Platt has later admitted that he did this because unidentified "agents of the Government" visited him and told him to follow this course.

Judge Thomas Platt: Did you know that Thomas Platt´s nephew David Platt died on Pan Am 103 ? Or that Thomas Platt was the judge who sentenced whistleblower Lester Coleman to jail for claiming Pan Am 103 was a US-drug-trade accident ? And later threatened him to remain silent ?
Or why not read a complaint against the senile judge Platt of judicial misconduct in more than 20 different cases?

 

 

Mexican Journalist, Pablo Pineda, Slain and Dumped across the Border in Texas

The Associate Press reports :

LOS INDIOS, Texas (April 10, 2000 9:39 a.m. EDT ) - The body of a Mexican journalist was dumped across the border in Texas on Sunday as federal agents looked on.

Border Patrol agents were watching the area Sunday and saw two men carry a large bundle across the Rio Grande, dump it on the U.S. bank and return to Mexico.

The agents assumed the bundle dumped in Los Indios, 15 miles south of Harlingen, contained something illegal and waited for someone to pick it up. They eventually went to inspect it and discovered the body of Pablo Pineda, 38, his head covered with a plastic bag, Cameron County Sheriff Omar Lucio said.

Pineda, who lived in Matamoros, Mexico, had been shot in the back of the head with a 9 mm gun, Lucio said.

"It was an execution-style shooting," Lucio said.

For the past eight months, Pineda had been a reporter and photographer for La Opinion in Matamoros. He had survived a previous shooting. His aggressive style made him unpopular with the police and criminals, said Martin Castillo, the newspaper's chief police reporter.

"He was a strong person who wanted to discover and uncover anything criminal," Castillo said. "He was snooping. He wanted to cover every story whether it be a murder, kidnapping or crashes."

Pineda was severely beaten three years ago.

"He had a lot of enemies, Castillo said.

NEWSMAKINGNEWS SOS!  WHAT DID PINEDA KNOW?  Salute!  He joins the ranks of Anson Ng, Danny Casolaro, Dorothy Killigalen and many others.  If anyone has any information about Mr. Pineda we will post it.

Russia Unveils U.S.-Built Chemical Weapons Lab


Reference: RussiaToday

MOSCOW (Reuters) U.S. and Russian officials opened an $18.5 million U.S.-funded laboratory to help eliminate chemical weapons on Wednesday, but the spirit of cooperation was overshadowed by the arrest of an U.S. citizen for spying.

The laboratory, in a high security chemicals institute, is the first step towards building a weapons destruction complex in the Ural mountains, where a seventh of Russia's huge arsenal of nerve, blister and choking agents are kept.

While the U.S. ambassador to Russia, James Collins, hailed the opening of the unit as a mark of cooperation, Russia's FSB security service announced that it had detained a U.S. citizen and a Russian on suspicion of spying.

"I don't have a comment on it," Collins told reporters. "I was just informed that this was on the news wires."

The arrest was the latest in a series of spy cases between Russia and the West a decade after the end of the Cold War.

Post-Cold War cooperation has U.S. taxpayers providing vast sums to make safe both Russia's 40,000 metric tons of chemical arms and the United States' own 32,500 tons.

Moscow has said it cannot afford to foot the bill alone and has also asked for help in decommissioning 24 sites capable of producing anything from sarin nerve agent to mustard gas.

ONE DROP CAN KILL

"Nerve agents are very lethal - one drop can kill," said Miguel Morales, a spokesman for the U.S.-funded Cooperative Threat Reduction Program (CTRP). "And Russian nerve agents are more lethal than those of the U.S."

When Moscow ratified an international ban on chemical weapons in 1997, officials estimated destroying its stockpiles would cost $5 billion over 10 years.

The new laboratory is a high technology catacomb of whirring pipes and spotless white rooms housed in a brick building, incongruous next to the decaying concrete of the
complex. Its aim is to train scientists and build monitoring equipment.

"When you're destroying chemical weapons, you want to make sure they're completely destroyed," Morales said.

Destroying Russian chemical weapons, mounted in bombs, missiles, spray tanks and bulk containers, is complicated by welded construction making it impossible to "unscrew" them, as is the case for U.S. weapons.

Zinovi Pak, the director of Russia's Munitions Agency, welcomed the new facility, but said Moscow would not be able to destroy the 400 tons of weapons by the end of this month as laid out in the international chemical weapons ban.

"We will do everything to meet the second deadline - we need to destroy 8,000 tons by April 29, 2002," he said. Russia has started work on building one weapon disposal site at Gornoye on the Volga river and the United States has pledged to build a site at Shchuchye in the Ural mountains.

U.S. TO PAY $888 MILLION

Adolph Ernst, project manager for CTRP, said the total U.S. contribution to destroying Russia's chemical arsenal would amount to $888 million over 10 years.

But he said the U.S. Congress had given no money in fiscal year 2000 for construction - contributions are reviewed annually. "They wanted examples of Russia working in a more cooperative spirit," he said.

Pak said Moscow had allocated 590 million rubles ($20.5 million) for chemical weapons destruction this year.His U.S. counterpart, General Thomas Kuenning, said the U.S. and Russian experts had worked excellently together.

"We had a period of time when we had to learn to work with each other and learn to trust each other, but I think we're through that period now," he said.

(C)2000 Copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved. Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Reuters Limited.

 

Russia Unveils U.S.-Built Chemical Weapons Lab

Russia Today © 2000 reports:

MOSCOW (Reuters) U.S. and Russian officials opened an $18.5 million U.S.-funded laboratory to help eliminate chemical weapons on Wednesday, but the spirit of cooperation was overshadowed by the arrest of an U.S. citizen for spying.

The laboratory, in a high security chemicals institute, is the first step towards building a weapons destruction complex in the Ural mountains, where a seventh of Russia's huge arsenal of nerve, blister and choking agents are kept.

While the U.S. ambassador to Russia, James Collins, hailed the opening of the unit as a mark of cooperation, Russia's FSB security service announced that it had detained a U.S. citizen and a Russian on suspicion of spying.

"I don't have a comment on it," Collins told reporters. "I was just informed that this was on the news wires."

The arrest was the latest in a series of spy cases between Russia and the West a decade after the end of the Cold War.

Post-Cold War cooperation has U.S. taxpayers providing vast sums to make safe both Russia's 40,000 metric tons of chemical arms and the United States' own 32,500 tons.

Moscow has said it cannot afford to foot the bill alone and has also asked for help in decommissioning 24 sites capable of producing anything from sarin nerve agent to mustard gas.

ONE DROP CAN KILL

"Nerve agents are very lethal - one drop can kill," said Miguel Morales, a spokesman for the U.S.-funded Cooperative Threat Reduction Program (CTRP). "And Russian nerve agents are more lethal than those of the U.S."

When Moscow ratified an international ban on chemical weapons in 1997, officials estimated destroying its stockpiles would cost $5 billion over 10 years.

The new laboratory is a high technology catacomb of whirring pipes and spotless white rooms housed in a brick building, incongruous next to the decaying concrete of the
complex. Its aim is to train scientists and build monitoring equipment.

"When you're destroying chemical weapons, you want to make sure they're completely destroyed," Morales said.

Destroying Russian chemical weapons, mounted in bombs, missiles, spray tanks and bulk containers, is complicated by welded construction making it impossible to "unscrew" them, as is the case for U.S. weapons.

Zinovi Pak, the director of Russia's Munitions Agency, welcomed the new facility, but said Moscow would not be able to destroy the 400 tons of weapons by the end of this month as laid out in the international chemical weapons ban.

"We will do everything to meet the second deadline - we need to destroy 8,000 tons by April 29, 2002," he said. Russia has started work on building one weapon disposal site at Gornoye on the Volga river and the United States has pledged to build a site at Shchuchye in the Ural mountains.

U.S. TO PAY $888 MILLION

Adolph Ernst, project manager for CTRP, said the total U.S. contribution to destroying Russia's chemical arsenal would amount to $888 million over 10 years.

But he said the U.S. Congress had given no money in fiscal year 2000 for construction - contributions are reviewed annually. "They wanted examples of Russia working in a more cooperative spirit," he said.

Pak said Moscow had allocated 590 million rubles ($20.5 million) for chemical weapons destruction this year. His U.S. counterpart, General Thomas Kuenning, said the U.S. and Russian experts had worked excellently together.

"We had a period of time when we had to learn to work with each other and learn to trust each other, but I think we're through that period now," he said.

(C)2000 Copyright Reuters Limited