ACCESS, ACCESS AND MORE ACCESS--THE ONLY GAME IN TOWN!  DEUTCH PLAYS THE GAME WITH HIS SPECIAL ACCESS PROGRAMS.

WHAT ACCESS DID DEUTCH DOWNLOAD ON HIS HOME COMPUTER, AS HE WORKED FOR CITIBANK,  RAYTHEON AND SCHLUMBERGER, LTD.?   

DEUTCH DOWNLOADED ULTRA SECRET " SPECIAL ACCESS PROGRAMS," KNOWN TO BE THE  KEYS TO SPECIAL HIGH TECHNOLOGY WEAPONS AND SPECIAL INTELLIGENCE COLLECTION SYSTEMS.

Bill Gertz of the Washington Times, (2/20/00) reported:  

"Earlier this month, the CIA provided a diary kept by Mr. Deutch to the Pentagon that officials said contained details of special access programs....  Special access programs include some of the Pentagon's most sensitive information. Past programs have included special high-technology weapons and special intelligence collections systems. The Pentagon also has launched a special access program on electronic "information warfare" -- how to attack electronic and computer systems. That information is known to be a target of foreign intelligence services. Asked why the sensitive information, which was discovered in early 1997, was only supplied to the Pentagon 11 days ago, Adm. Quigley said, "I don't know that we had a full understanding at that point of what information may have been involved that was relevant to the Defense Department. First, we need to understand what the material that we received from the CIA contains. Where does that point us for future directions and courses of action? We just don't know yet until we're done reviewing that," Adm. Quigley said.

The special access programs were kept in 26 volumes of Deutch's diary stored on his home computers.  James Risen of the New York Times (2/2/00) reported that:

Among the 17,000 pages of documents discovered in files on the computers were top-secret and "code-word" files about a wide range of CIA activities, including presidentially approved covert action programs. The documents also included 26 volumes detailing his daily activities in his nearly two years as director and his previous time at the Pentagon."

In December 1996, according to the Inspector General's report,  the CIA discovered classified information that Deutch and stored on portable memory cards for use in writing memorandums and keeping his personal journal. (Emphasis added.)

WHO HAD ACCESS TO DEUTCH'S ACCESS?

1.  SCHLUMBERGER LTD.  AND ITS IRAQI CONTRACTS.

Colum Lynch, in a special to the Washington Post 2/20/200 reported:

Four years ago, when he was director of central intelligence, John M. Deutch headed up American efforts to overthrow Iraqi President Saddam Hussein. Today, Deutch sits on the board of Schlumberger Ltd., a multinational company that is helping Baghdad service its oil rigs.

As secretary of defense during the Persian Gulf War, Richard B. Cheney played a key role in the U.S.-led military coalition that forced Iraq to retreat from Kuwait. But as chief executive officer of Halliburton Co., a Dallas-based maker of oil equipment, Cheney recently held a major stake in Dresser-Rand and Ingersoll-Dresser Pump Co., two American players in the reconstruction of Iraq's oil industry.

While the United States and Britain wage almost daily air strikes against military installations in northern and southern Iraq, U.S. companies, executives and even some architects of American policy toward Iraq are doing business with Saddam Hussein's government and helping to rebuild its battered oil industry.

Though perfectly legal, the growing U.S.-Iraqi commerce has been kept quiet by both sides because it seems to fly in the face of Washington's commitment to "regime change" in Baghdad and Saddam Hussein's claim to be defying the world's lone superpower. The United Nations also helps both countries avoid embarrassment by treating the business arrangements as confidential.

The trade is permitted under the "oil for food" deal, a humanitarian exemption from the U.N. trade embargo imposed on Iraq after the 1990 invasion of Kuwait. It allows Iraq to sell oil and use the proceeds, under U.N. supervision, to purchase food, medicine and other humanitarian goods, as well as spare parts to keep the oil flowing.

Placing bids through overseas subsidiaries and affiliates, more than a dozen U.S. firms have signed millions of dollars in contracts with Baghdad for oil-related equipment since the summer of 1998, according to diplomats, industry officials and U.N. documents.

"The United States is the cradle of the international oil industry," said James Placke, who tracks Persian Gulf oil production for Cambridge Energy Research Associates, a consulting firm. "A lot of the equipment in Iraq's oil industry was originally made in America, and if you want spare parts, you go back to the original supplier."

Most U.S. oil companies have been prohibited by Baghdad from directly purchasing Iraqi crude since the United States bombed Iraq during Operation Desert Fox in December 1998. But Iraq nevertheless has emerged in the past year as the fastest growing source of U.S. oil imports, according to Larry Goldstein, president of the Petroleum Industry Research Foundation.

American companies, he said, now purchase about 700,000 of the 2 million barrels of oil exported daily by Iraq, mainly through foreign middlemen who load the Iraqi crude and transport it directly to American ports, primarily in the Gulf of Mexico....

According to diplomats and the Web site, American firms that have done business with Iraq, directly or through subsidiaries, include such petroleum industry giants as Halliburton, the world's largest oil field service company; Schlumberger, the second largest oil field servicer; the Fisher-Rosemount unit of Emerson Electric Co. in St. Louis; the Hamilton Sundstrand unit of United Technologies in Windsor Locks, Conn.; and Baker Hughes Inc. of Houston.

Deutch, the former CIA director who sits on the board of Schlumberger, and officials at the firm's New York headquarters did not respond to requests for comment on their dealings with Iraq.

"We don't play favorites," said a State Department official.

Click to read the entire article, "U.S. Firms Aiding Iraqi Oil Industry."

 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A9055-2000Feb19.html

2.  RAYTHEON CORP.

Deutch was appointed to a three year term on Raytheon's Board of Directors in 1998.  Raytheon's annual report filed in 1998 disclosed that Raytheon paid him consulting fees in excess of $62,000.  Raytheon neglected to file a copy of its Consulting Agreement as an exhibit to 10-K filed with the SEC on 12/31/98.  On January 21, 2000, this neglect was remedied when Raytheon filed is Amended 10-K for 1998 on January 21, 2000.  The Amended 10-K listed the Consulting Agreement executed on 4/1/98 as Exhibit 10.15.

NewsMakingNews asks: 

1) Because Raytheon required their Directors to hold security clearances, did the CIA delay, for almost two years, the fact it knew about Deutch's diary downloaded on his home computer?  

2) Did Raytheon pay Deutch to obtain classified insider information about their competitors?  

3) Are CIA Directors and Department of Energy employees required to disclose their income from outside sources?  

4) If such disclosure is required, did Deutch and/or Department of Energy employees Notra Trulock declare such income on their financial disclosure statements?

5)  Did Raytheon also employ those who investigated Wen Ho Lee, such as Notra Trulock, former counterintelligence officer for the DOE?

3. CITIBANK.

As  CIA Director, Deutch elevated Nora Slatkin to the position of CIA Executive Director.

Deutch resigned as CIA director in December 1996.  Deutch was then immediately elected to the board of directors of Citibank--reputedly the largest U.S. bank. 

When it became apparent that Deutch was under investigation, CIA director Tenet appointed Slatkin, as the CIA's monitor regarding Deutch's downloading classified data on his home computer. This would appear to be a direct conflict of interest because Ms. Slatkin was investigating her former boss.  Deutch apparently used his influence on Slatkin by recommending the very agent who was investigating him to a management job at Citibank, while she was still investigating him.  The New York Times reported (2/12/00) Slatkin notified the agency in June 1997 that she was considering a job with Citibank and would withdraw from consideration of matters involving the bank.  However, within a month Slatkin reviewed a CIA internal report of findings in the Deutch investigation.  Slatkin resigned from the CIA in September 1997, and became a Citibank Vice- President the next month.                                  

NewsMakingNews asks:  Did CIA Director Tenet cover up the security violations of former Director Deutch when Tenet appointed Slatkin to investigate her boss Deutch?                   

Click to read "The Ultimate Revolving Door--Deutch's Mouse Caught in the Door."

4. SAIC CORP. AND MIT.

In February 2000, Deutch was forced to give up his Pentagon security clearance that allowed him to work on classified defense contracts.  Deutch's Pentagon security clearance permitted him to work as a paid consultant on Defense Department contracts with Raytheon Corp., SAIC Corp and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  Deutch also sat on eight other corporate boards.  For over a year, Deutch was allowed to work on classified defense contracts despite his violation of security, per the CIA.  In the summer 1998, the CIA removed Deutch's CIA security clearances, and the Pentagon suspended Deutch's security clearance from the Defense Intelligence Agency, and did not renew his clearance to serve as a member of the Defense Science Board--the panel of scientists who advise the Defense Department on research projects. 

A NEWSMAKINGNEWS QUESTIONS:  Did Deutch use his diary, with its access programs (or his recollection of data obtained from them), to aid Schlumberger's contracts with Iraq?  Or is Deutch a pure soul who deftly compartmentalized his classified data from his unclassified work making money for corporations selling military defense products?

On Tuesday, February 22, 2000, former CIA director Deutch will testify before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence to explain how ultra secret special access programs were loaded onto his unsecured, unclassified home computer.  It's a closed hearing.

STAY TUNED!


 

 

 

.